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Information on Symposia per Science Theme





Theme No.

Theme Title

Number of Symposia proposed

Symposia Title

Symposia Conveners

Biographical sketch of the Conveners

Keywords

Abstract

10

Orogens through time


Prof. Deepanker Asthana

deepanker.asthana@gmail.com


Prof. Anil M. Pophare

apophare@gmail.com


Prof. Peter Cawood

Peter.Cawood@monash.edu

8

Timescales and Tracers: Unpicking Orogenies Through Time


Oliver Nebel Oliver.Nebel@monash.edu (Australia)


Nicholas Gardiner (Australia),


Tim Johnson, (Australia)


Tim's research has concentrated on the study of crystalline rocks from a variety of geodynamic settings and what these can tell us about fundamental processes on Earth. His expertise lies in metamorphic petrology, in particular the application of phase equilibria modelling using internally consistent thermodynamic data.

Tim has specific interests in the generation, segregation and migration of melt in the crust and upper mantle, the fundamental processes driving the evolution of the lithosphere. More recently his research has concentrated on early Earth processes, in particular in Archaean geodynamics and the generation and modification of Earth's first crust.


Advances in geochronology, thermochronology, petrochronology, and the application of various stable and radiogenic isotopic tracers, now provide an unprecedented toolkit for the temporal and geochemical resolution of the stages of orogeny. This symposia welcome contributions on orogens through time, from the assembly of Archaean cratons, through to modern active orogenic systems. High-precision dating techniques and proxies for prolonged geodynamic processes are welcome, as are applications of traditional isotope tracers and new analytical tools such as non-traditional stable isotopes.

Proterozoic Orogens, Tectonic Geography and the Earth System

Alan Collins

alan.collins@adelaide.edu.au

(Australia)


Grant Cox (Australia)


Morgan Blades (Australia)

Professor Alan Collins received a BSc (Hons.) degree from the Royal School of Mines, Imperial College, The University of London, then completed a PhD in 1997 at The University of Edinburgh on the tectonics of SW Turkey. Alan Collins is Director of the Centre for Tectonics, Resources and Exploration (TRaX).


The Proterozoic is a period when eukaryote cells evolved, the Earth’s climate radically fluctuated, the atmosphere and oceans became oxic and when the supercontinental pulse carved up landmasses, developed and closed oceanic gateways and vast mountain ranges—it is the aeon when the Earth became habitable. In this multi-disciplinary symposium, we are seeking submissions that unravel the geology of the orogens that record plate-interactions. Distribution and evolution of plates and plate tectonics through the Nuna/Columbia–Rodinia–Gondwana supercontinent cycle, to their effect on the evolving broader Earth System will also be discussed.

Phanerozoic orogenesis in Asia – the record of the Tethys Opening and Closing

Guochun Zhao, gzhao@hku.hk (Hong Hong),

YunpengDong (China);

Di-Cheng Zhu (China)


Professor Guochun Zhao holds a Ph.D. degree from Curtin University (Western Australia) Prof. Zhao’s major scientific findings include recognition of two Paleoproterozoic continent-continent collisional belts (Khondalite Belt and Trans-North China Orogen) in the North China Craton and global-scale 2.1-1.8 Ga continent-continent collisional events that led to the assembly of Paleo-Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Columbia (Nuna). Prof. Zhao is now the Editor of Precambrian Research.


Asia consists of a series of continental blocks bounded by Phanerozoic orogens. These orogens record the opening, expansion and closure of the Neo-Tethys and its precursor oceans. This symposium seeks contributions that highlight new advances in understanding the history of the continental fragments, the evolution of the Tethys oceans, and the processes of Asian assembly.

Secular Change in Magmatism and Metamorphism: the Fingerprints of Orogenesis

Tim Johnson,

Tim.Johnson@curtin.edu.au

(Australia)

Tim's research has concentrated on the study of crystalline rocks from a variety of geodynamic settings and what these can tell us about fundamental processes on Earth. His expertise lie in metamorphic petrology, in particular the application of phase equilibria modelling using internally consistent thermodynamic data.

Tim has specific interests in the generation, segregation and migration of melt in the crust and upper mantle, the fundamental processes driving the evolution of the lithosphere. More recently his research has concentrated on early Earth processes, in particular in Archaean geodynamics and the generation and modification of Earth's first crust.


On the modern Earth, specific tectonic settings within orogenic belts are characterized by different styles of magmatism and metamorphism. These provide tectonic ‘fingerprints’, mainly chemical in the case of igneous rocks and thermal in the case of metamorphism, which permit constraints on the geotectonic setting of older rocks, where much of the supporting evidence may have been destroyed. How far back into deep geological time these tectonic fingerprints can be relied upon remains debated, as the evidence generally becomes circumstantial rather than direct. This symposium invites contributions from studies of magmatic and metamorphic rocks of any age with a view to assessing, improving and questioning their potential use as petrogenetic indicators within a broad range of orogenic settings.

Precambrian orogenic Processes and the Formation of Continents: Insights from Models and Observations

Paul Tackley paul.tackley@erdw.ethz.ch (Switzerland)


Tara Garya (Switzerland)


Paul Tackley has been Professor for Geophysical Fluid Dynamics in the Institute of Geophysics, Department of Earth Sciences since 2005. Paul Tackley got his BA in Natural Sciences (Physics major) 1987 from the University of Cambridge, UK, (1st Class Honors).

1991 he got his MSc in Geophysics from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, CA, USA and in 1993 a M.A. Natural Sciences (Physics major) from the University of Cambridge. He earned his PhD in Geophysics at Caltech in 1994.


Orogenic processes responsible for the formation of continents in the Precambrian were different from those operating at the present day. In this symposium we invite abstracts on possible scenarios of Precambrian orogeny and their influence on the formation, evolution and assembly of the continental crust and cratonic mantle roots. Both numerical and analogue modelling studies are invited.

The pre-Mesozoic record of the India-Asia Collision Zone

Paul Myrow

pmyrow@coloradocollege.edu

(USA)


Nigel Hughes

(UK)


Mike Searle

(UK)


A sedimentary geologist with a wide array of research interests. My work has largely centered on the interpretation of sedimentary rocks and structures. I have worked in the Himalaya and Southeast Asian region for the last 12 years, and have done three seasons in Antarctica, specifically the Transantarctic Mountains. I am presently involved in studies of Devonian strata of the southwest U.S.; Cambrian strata in the Rocky Mountains, Antarctica, Himalaya, and Inner Mongolia; analysis of wave ripple dynamics using a flume at MIT; and a number of other projects.


The Himalaya is the iconic location for study of active continent–continent collision and mountain system that preserves an extensive Precambrian and Paleozoic history including the widespread Cambrian–Ordovician Kurgiakh/Bhimphedian orogeny. This symposium invites abstracts on pre-Mesozoic igneous, metamorphic, and structural records of this region, particularly with regard to paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions of Gondwana’s northern margin.

Intraplate Tectonics and Continental Development: Orogens and Basins

Alan Aitken alan.aitken@uwa.edu.au

(Australia)

WeronikaGorczyk (Australia)

Sandra Occhipinti (Australia)

Klaus Gessner (Australia)

A leading researcher in the use of integrated geoscience methods to increase our understanding of the tectonic processes that control the architecture of continents, and their importance for natural resources and geological hazards.


This symposium seeks contributions on intraplate orogens and intraplate basin-forming events those shaped the development of Earth’s continents through time. These may include investigations of thermal, compositional and rheological changes during rifting and orogenesis, and also processes such as cratonization and lithospheric destabilisation. Studies of secular change in intraplate tectonic processes are particularly welcome.

Convergent Margins and Mineralization

Jeremy Richards

JRichards2@laurentian.ca

(Canada)


1987–1990 Australian National University (Ph.D.)

1983–1986 University of Toronto, Canada (M.Sc.)

1980–1983 University of Cambridge, UK (B.A. Hons.)


Convergent margins, including ocean–ocean and ocean–continent subduction zones, and arc–continent and continent–continent collision zones, host a wide range of magmatic and hydrothermal ore deposits due to the recycling of volatiles, especially H2O, Cl, and S, through subducted seafloor-altered oceanic lithosphere. This symposium will explore the formation of ore deposits in these various convergent margin settings, including back-arc and surficial environments