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Information on Symposia per Science Theme





Theme No.

Theme Title

Number of Symposia proposed

Symposia Title

Symposia Conveners

Biographical sketch of the Conveners

Keywords

Abstract

22

Evolution of Monsoon: Past, Present and Future


Dr. Rahul Mohan

rahulmohan@ncaor.gov.in

(India)


Dr. Arun Deo Singh

arundeosingh@yahoo.com

(India)


Dr. Pallavi Anand

pallavi.anand@open.ac.uk

(UK)

5

Advances in Our Understanding of Global Hydro-Climate Dynamics Before Cenozoic

Robert A Spicer r.a.spicer@open.ac.uk

(UK)


Vandana Prasad (India)


Prof Robert (Bob) Spicer current research spans two areas of ecosystem and climate evolution critical to understanding and managing global change issues. The first is landscape and monsoon evolution in southern Asia. The second is the evolution of high latitude vegetation and climate.


Dr Vandana Prasad is a Senior Scientist at BSIP-Lucknow, India with interest in High resolution biostratigraphy, biotic turnover, paleoenvironment, relative sea level change and paleomonsoon


It is being increasingly realized that broader understanding of present day regional monsoon dynamics can be better achieved from its global perspectives. Although, regional monsoons are recognized as a global system, each subsystem has its own features and patterns of variability on different time scales. The concept of global monsoon hinges upon the annual variation in precipitation and circulation in the global tropics to subtropics and annual migration of ITCZ. Emerging evidences have suggested that modern monsoon sub-systems were established in late Cenozoic after reorganization of land and sea. There has been growing interests in recent years in paleomonsoon studies across the world for the time interval prior to the Cenozoic, This symposium invites contributions on: Origin and Evolution of global monsoon system (prior to Cenozoic) in time and space and its driving factors. Nature and pattern of global Hydro-climate system (mega-monsoon) during Permian to Jurassic (Pangaea supercontinent). Modeling of large-scale meridional migration of the ITCZ over Pangaea. Causes for differences in the origin and evolution of modern regional monsoon systems.

Evolution of Monsoon Variability on Tectonic Scale During the Cenozoic

Ann Holbourn ann.holbourn@ifg.uni-kiel.de (Germany)


Raj K. Singh

(India)


Dr Ann Holnourn is research scientist at Kiel University, Germany. She investigates the evolution of ocean ciculation and climate on various timescales from the Cretaceous to the present and us interested in understanding the mechanisms driving changes in ocean productivity, temperature, oxygenation, ice volume and carbon cycling. Her research is primarily based on the geochemical analysis of foraminifera and marine sediment properties.

Dr. Raj K. Singh is Assistant Professor in School of Earth, Ocean and Climate Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar. His research interest focuses on understanding the evolution of Asian Monsoon system and its variations in longer (orbital scale cyclicity) and shorter (solar cycle) time scale. Dr. Singh has innovatively used deep-sea benthic foraminifera and planktic foraminifera to understand this monsoon variability.


Monsoon climate has varied through geologic time due to orbital parameters and tectonic processes resulting openings/closures of oceanic gateways, upliftment of mountains and position of continents. The tectonic processes operate over time spans > 106 years. Monsoon history at tectonic time scale traces back beyond the Quaternary. Over recent decades, there has been rapid advances in paleomonsoon reconstructions based on marine and terrestrial proxy records, in order to better understand climate-tectonic coupling. It is also believed that climate-driven erosion can also influence tectonism and the mountain belts architecture. However, it is essential to understand how the tectonic processes and climate-driven erosion interact and feed-back on each other in order to test and quantify linkages among them. In recent years, the International Ocean Drilling Programs (IODP) were taken up to study the pattern of variability in regional monsoon systems on tectonic, orbital and suborbital scales. This symposium invites contributions on (1) Origin, evolution, pattern variability and controlling factors of regional monsoon sub-systems on tectonic scale (2) Nature of the monsoon sub-system variability patterns from Paleogene to Neogene. New advances in tectonic scale monsoon evolution from recent IODP Expeditions (Expeditions 346, 253, 354, 355, 356, 359, 363).

Monsoon Evolution Pattern on Orbital to Suborbital and Centennial to Interdecadal Scales

Stephan Steinke ssteinke@xmu.edu.cn

(China)


Sushant Naik (India)


Prof.Stephan Steinke is a palaeoceanographer, paleoclimatolgists and micropalaeonologitst specializing in past climate change with an emphasis on the mid- and low-latitude climate, particularly in the following areas: South and East Asian monsoon variability and Indo-Pacific Warm Pool hydroclimate. He is currently an Professor at the Department of Geological Oceanography and State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (MEL), Xiamen University, China.

Dr. Sushant Niak is a paleoceanographer and paleoclimatologist with keen interest in past climate change with emphasis on utilizing foraminifera for deciphering paleomonsoon, past pCO2 and pH. He is a Scientist with the National Institute of Oceanography, at Goa, India


An understanding of the dynamics of regional monsoon variability and its relationship with other climate components is essential to our ability to predict monsoon, in the context of rapid climate change scenario. Paleomonsoon records from both marine and terrestrial archives from tropical-subtropical regions have shown variations in monsoon climate on orbital, millennial, and centennial to decadal scales. However, atmospheric and oceanographic processes involved for these changes and phase relationship (leads/lags) between these processes are not fully understood. Evidences suggest that apart from external orbital forcings and solar control, millennial to centennial scale changes in monsoon system are linked to the high latitude northern Hemisphere climate. Furthermore, there are strong evidences suggesting linkages between short term decadal scale monsoon variability and tropical Indo-Pacific climate and ENSO. We invite contributions on paleomonsoon studies made through various proxies from marine and terrestrial archives and recent IODP expeditions and modeling studies. The contributions are expected to address: External and internal climate forcing factors controlling monsoon variability. Short term variability and its linkages to internal climate variability such as high latitude climatic perturbations, inter-hemisheric climate relationships, atmosphere-ocean teleconnections, high and low latitude climate linkages (e.g., North Atlantic Oscillation, Atlantic Meridional Oscillation, El Nino Southern Oscillation, and Indo-Pacific oscillation/Pacific decadal oscillation).

Holocene Monsoon History with Focus on Changes During Last Two Millennia

Ashish Sinha asinha@csudh.edu (USA)


Gayatri Kathayat (China)


Prosenjit Ghosh (India)


[1] Dr. Ashish Sinha is a professor of earth science in California State University Dominguez Hills, USA. He received his PhD and MS in Geological Science from the University of Southern California, USA (1997) and University of Roorkee, India (1989), respectively. His current research strives to understand the past, present and future of climate change using speleothem and other proxy records from tropical and monsoonal regions.

[2] Dr. Gayatri Kathayat is a postdoc of Isotope Geochemistry Laboratory in Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an China. She received her Ph.D. in Engineering (2016), MS in Earth and Build Environmental Science and Engineering from Xi’an Jiaotong University (2014) and an additional MS in Geological Science from Kumoun University, Nainital (2006) respectively.

The main focus of her current research is on the hi-fidelity reconstruction of the Indian summer monsoon variability on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales to understand the past, present, and future of climate change using speleothem as the proxy.

[3] Dr. Prosenjit Ghosh is Assistant Professor at the Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Indian Institute of Science in the year 2007. His research interest focuses on reconstruction of seasonality through time using empirical relationships between the proxy records and climate parameters, and application of stable isotope technique to understand environmental processes. Most notable contributions have been the establishment of clumped isotope thermometry, generating standards for mass spectrometric analysis of solids and gaseous CO2 in air mixture, application of isotope based GCM to study Indian Monsoon precipitation.


Previously the climate variation in the Holocene was considered relatively much lesser to that of the last glacial period. Recent studies provide strong evidences of high amplitude, multidecadal to centennial scale variability of monsoon climate during the Holocene, associated to sunspot activity and also to abrupt reorganization of the thermohaline circulation. As there is strong relationship between the Holocene monsoons and human civilization, the interests in understanding Holocene monsoon variability and its causing factors have increased among the scientific community particularly in context of current scenario of anthropogenic induced green house gases and global warming. The contributions are invited on various aspects of Holocene Monsoon such as variability patterns as recorded from marine and terrestrial archives, geoarcheological sites, documentary resources. Human adaptations to past monsoon changes. Evaluation of magnitudes of natural and anthropogenic forcings. Identifying past climate analogues projecting the future. Projected changes in the monsoon (ocean-atmosphere coupled models and earth system models).

Megadroughts: Past, Present, and Future

Gayatri Kathayat kathayat@xjtu.edu.cn

(China)


Ashish Sinha

(USA)


Dr. Gayatri Kathayat is a postdoc of Isotope Geochemistry Laboratory in Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an China. She received her Ph.D. in Engineering (2016), MS in Earth and Build Environmental Science and Engineering from Xi’an Jiaotong University (2014) and an additional MS in Geological Science from Kumoun University, Nainital (2006) respectively.

The main focus of her current research is on the hi-fidelity reconstruction of the Indian summer monsoon variability on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales to understand the past, present, and future of climate change using speleothem as the proxy.


Dr. Ashish Sinha is a professor of earth science in California State University Dominguez Hills, USA. He received his PhD and MS in Geological Science from the University of Southern California, USA (1997) and University of Roorkee, India (1989), respectively. His current research strives to understand the past, present and future of climate change using speleothem and other proxy records from tropical and monsoonal regions


Megadroughts are spatially extensive droughts lasting decades and perhaps even centuries. Megadroughts have repeatedly challenged the resilience of many ancient and medieval cultures and radically altered their historical trajectories. Indeed, a near-global megadrought 4,200 years now marks the most recent unit of Holocene. Decades-long drought in the Sahel during the latter half of the 20th century and in the SW United States in recent decades comprise modern examples of megadrought--but they pale in comparison to the earlier Holocene megadroughts documented by a global array of high-resolution proxy records. Nevertheless, the underlying and complex causal mechanisms of megadroughts remain poorly understood. We invite contributions that characterize the spatio-temporal pattern and magnitudes of megadroughts and strive to understand their causal mechanisms using instrumental observations, paleoclimate proxy records, and climate modeling. We also welcome contributions that investigate the societal impacts of past, present, and future megadroughts.