PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS & SHORT COURSES

The 36th IGC is offering opportunities to the registered delegates to participate in the Professional Development Workshops/ Short Courses. All the workshops/ short courses proposed by experts and organisations will be held during 4-7 March 2020 at the Congress venue, the exact timings and duration of which will be notified later.

The last date for booking workshops/ short courses is 31 January 2020. However, seats in each workshop/ short course will be filled up strictly on “First-Come-First-Serve” basis. Individuals are not allowed to register in more than one course that is “free of charge”. However, for a subscriber of any paid course, participation in one free course, if opted, may be allowed. All participants joining the workshops/ short courses are requested to bring their own laptops for use during the courses.

For any queries related to the Workshop/ Short Courses, please reach us at  bm.wsc@36igc.org.

 

 Workshop / Short Course: WSC01

 Title

The four pillars of mineral exploration through cover: regolith mapping, landscape evolution, geochemical dispersion processes and geophysical data

 Details

As near surface mineral resources diminishing a major challenge that bedrock mineral exploration faces in many parts of the world is exploring efficiently and    effectively through extensive and thick cover. This short course aims to provide an exploration toolkit through areas of deep and various types of cover by providing  an   overview of a variety of methods for state of the art cover exploration, including regolith mapping, landscape evolution, geochemical dispersion processes and efficient   geophysical tools to map cover depth and type. A systematic application of those methods at a range of scales can be used to reveal patterns and correlations linked   to mineralisation processes in the subsurface. Understanding of these processes can help identify regional correlations and assessments, and, in turn, will assist in   focusing mineral exploration even through thick cover.

Landscapes are fundamentally linked to climatic conditions, tectonic activity, and geological features. Understanding landscape evolution of the cover and its   architecture can guide surface geochemical surveys, by recommending the best sample media for tracing vertical and lateral geochemical dispersion associated with   basement and regolith geochemical footprints. Development of descriptive geochemical models for landscapes above mineral deposits will inform surface   geochemical sampling strategies tailored to these prospective regions.

The use of geophysical datasets such as magnetics and gravimetrics has dominated the mapping of basement geology before   subsequent drilling is carried out. In   addition, subject to data density and the depth of ground penetration (>400 m), airborne   electromagnetics (AEM) can be a powerful tool to correlate the geology   between known stratigraphic cover profiles. This has the   potential to significantly improve the cover architecture reconstruction in 3D, which has important   implications for describing landscape and regolith evolution and, therefore, for interpreting landscape geochemistry.

At the end of the short course participants can hands-on apply the newly learned skills for exploring through cover using examples   from different regolith contexts   from Australia.

 Presenters

 1. Dr. Carmen Krapf (Carmen.Krapf@sa.gov.au)

 2. Dr. Ignacio González-Álvarez (Ignacio.Gonzalez-Alvarez@csiro.au)

 Affiliations

 1. Geological Survey of South Australia, GPO Box 320, Adelaide SA 5001

 2. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia

 Domain of the Presenters

Dr Krapf and Dr González-Álvarez are both experts in landscape evolution, weathering processes, trace element mobility and multi-scale mineral exploration under   cover.

 Date & Place

 Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

 Target Group

All geoscientist with an interest in mineral exploration and cover characterisation

 Number of Participants

 Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

 Cost

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC02

Title

 Statistical and Geostatistical Analyses for Mineral Exploration

Details

The geologists collect various spatially distributed point data sets from mineral exploration and environmental characterization sites. The classical statistical data analysis provides valuable basic information, which is used in various decision making processes. Spatial data analysis may include generating two dimensional contours of the point values such as Pb% or, As ppm or, Fe % etc. which provides a general trend and spatial variability. Most of the time contouring involves ‘interpolation’. The accuracy of interpolation in two and three dimensions is important in predicting value at an unsampled location. This is where geostatistical techniques found importance. Currently ordinary kriging, a geostatistical interpolation technique, is inbuilt in many software tools for interpolation purposes.

In this short course, discussions will start with basic statistical analyses of a given set of data used as an example. The spatial data analyses topic will include simple non-geostatistical techniques such as inverse distance power and linear geostatistical interpolation technique, ordinary kriging.

Classification of estimates (quantity and quality) derived from statistical and Geostatistical estimations into various categories of resources based on statistical and Geostatistical parameters and internationally recognized public reporting standards will be discussed.

Using example data set and a freely available software tool, participants will be able to gain practical knowledge on spatial data analyses using couple of hands on exercises. Participants are required to use their own laptop computers or, arrange to share the computers with other participants.

Presenters

Dr. Abani R Samal (arsamal@gmail.com)

Affiliations

GeoGlobal LLC

Domain of the Presenters

Dr Abani R Samal holds M. Tech degree from IIT(ISM), Dhanbad, MS and DIC from Imperial College, London and PhD from SIU-C, USA. He has nearly 22 years of experience in the mining industry and recognized for his expertise in mineral deposit evaluation. He is a Registered Membership of SME and a Certified Professional Geologist (CPG) with AIPG. He also maintains as a life member of MEAI, MGMI, fellow of GSI (India), a Fellow of SEG.

Date & Place

Wednesday & Thursday 04 & 05 March 2020;

At venue

Target Group

Mineral Exploration Geologists, Post-Graduates Studying Mineral Systems

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 225 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC03

Title

An Introduction to R, SSLib and ETAS Modelling

Details

The Statistical Seismology Library (SSLib) is: a collection of earthquake hypocentral catalogues with space-time-magnitude variables set out in the same format, software that can be used to subset and manipulate the catalogues, software that can be used to perform Exploratory Data Analyses (EDA), and software that can be used to fit stochastic models, in particular, point process models and hidden Markov models. The ETAS package is Fits the space-time Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model to earthquake catalogs using a stochastic declustering approach.

The SSLib software is written in the R Language, and consists of a number of R packages. Each package has its own reference manual that contains documentation for all functions within that package. The ETAS package is based on a Fortran program by J Zhuang and modified and translated into C++ and C such that it can be called from R. Parallel computing with OpenMP is possible on supported platforms. Both sets of software have been developed in the UNIX and Linux operating systems though versions compatible with the Microsoft Windows operating system are also available.

This short course will be for two days. Firstly, there will be an introduction to the R software, and then an introduction to the SSLib and ETAS software. Some examples will be given on how this can be used for probabilistic earthquake forecasting. While there are now GUI interfaces for some routines in R, this workshop will place the emphasis on simple R scripts.

Presenters

1.Dr. David Harte (D.Harte@gns.cri.nz)

2. Dr. J. Zhuang (zhuangjc@ism.ac.jp)

3. Dr. Ting Wang (ting.wang@otago.ac.nz)

Affiliations

1. GNS Science, New Zealand 

2. Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Japan

3. Otago University, New Zealand

Domain of the Presenters

1. Dr. David Harte is a statistical seismologist at GNS Science in NZ, and an associate at Statistics Research Associates in Wellington NZ. His current research is in the application of point process models to earthquake occurrence.

 2.Dr. J. Zhuang is associate professor at Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tachikawa, Tokyo, Japan; Current research: Point process, statistical seismicity, especially on seismicity modelling, forecasting, and forecasting evaluation

 3. Dr. Ting Wang is Senior Lecturer at the University of Otago in NZ. Current research includes statistical modelling (point process, hidden Markov models, signal processing) and applications in earthquake and volcanic hazards.

Date & Place

Wednesday & Thursday 04 & 05 March 2020;

At venue

Target Group

Researchers that analyse seismic data, describe its empirical characteristics, and produce probabilistic earthquake forecasts. No prior knowledge of the R software will be required. The training will be useful to the researchers working in different fields of earth sciences.

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC04

Title

Geoheritage and Geoconservation: Principles, Methods, and Challenges of an Applied Geoscience

Details

This short course aims to present and discuss the main concepts and methods related with geodiversity, geoheritage, geoconservation, and geoparks. Based on numerous examples from different countries, participants will understand what is geoheritage, why it should be conserved, how it can be identified and used, why geoheritage matters to geoscientists, and how geoheritage relates with nature conservation, land-use planning, education, and sustainable development. The importance of geoheritage in international initiatives such as the UNESCO’s World Heritage and Global Geoparks will also be discussed, together with a holistic approach of geoconservation in the international arena. Participants do not need to have previous knowledge about geoheritage or geoconservation.

Presenters

Prof. José Brilha (jbrilha@dct.uminho.pt)

Affiliations

ProGEO (The European Association for the Conservation of Geological Heritage) and Professor in University of Minho, Portugal

Domain of the Presenters

Research on Geoheritage, Geoconservation and Geodiversity

Date & Place

Wednesday & Thursday 04 & 05 March 2020;

At venue

Target Group

Geoscientists working in the academia, public services, geological surveys, private companies, and graduate and post-graduate geoscience students

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC05

Title

Women in Geosciences

Details

Women are generally under-represented in the geoscience discipline, and often face gender specific challenges while pursuing their degree or upon entering the workforce. This roundtable will focus on these challenges and offer opportunities for women geoscientists to connect and network with each other. After a brief introduction from several associations that help to promote the development of female geoscientists, the workshop will feature two keynote speakers, both offering their perspective on being a successful geoscientist while overcoming stigmas, cultural, political, and socio-economic hardships. The keynote presentations will be followed by small group discussions where participants will examine several key issues and propose resolutions for each topic.

Each of the small groups will then share their discussion highlights with the other participants, and lead a larger conversation about the given topic. This roundtable will provide students and early-career geoscientists with a variety of thought provoking themes and the necessary discussions in order to advance within the field of geoscience.

Presenters

1. Ms. Ndivhuwo Cecilia Mukosi (ncmukosi@gmail.com)   

2. Prof. Ezzoura Errami

3. Dr. Tanvi  Arora

Affiliations

African Association of Women in Geoscience; YES Network and Council for Geoscience 30A Schoeman Street Polokwane, South Africa

Domain of the Presenters

Field Geology and Legacy

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Female Geoscientists

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC06

Title

Use of Fluid Inclusions in Exploration for Magmatic-Hydrothermal Ore Deposits

Details

To provide an overview of the use of fluid inclusions in exploration for magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits

Presenters

Prof. Robert J Bodnar (rjb@vt.edu)         

Affiliations

Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences

4044 Derring Hall Blacksburg, United States

Domain of the Presenters

Studying fluid inclusions and mineral deposits for 45 years

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Graduate students and young professionals, especially those working in the minerals industry

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 200 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC07

Title

Social Responsibility in Geoscience Education

Details

It has strongly been observed over the years the need to make the geoscience students aware that social skills are also necessary to make them more well rounded and for them to have the capability of engaging stakeholders in their research and work in the field for the mutual benefit of all. Therefore, a ‘Social Responsibility in Geoscience Education Workshop’, which Dr. Katz presented at the last IGC in Cape Town and has now been updated and refined for the 36th IGC. Dr. Katz has been involved with this initiative since 2011 after his formal retirement from the University of New South Wales, Schools of Applied Geology and Mining Engineering and he believes that it is worth pursuing as it is relevant in developing a more complete curricula that gives the students all the technical and social skills necessary for sustainable outcomes.

Presenter

Dr. Mike  Katz (mikekatz320@gmail.com)   

Affiliations

Professor (Retired) of University of New South Wales, 139 Darley Road Sydney, Australia

Domain of the Presenters

Over 60 years experience in geological research, geoscience and mining education and training

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Students, academics, government, industry

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC08

Title

Application of Radiogenic Isotopes in Ore Deposit Studies

Details

This workshop will provide an insight into the application of radiogenic and stable isotopes in ore deposit and metallogenic studies and their applications to exploration. The purpose of this Session is to cover the application of most commonly used radiogenic (Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, Re-Os, Ar-Ar) and stable (S, O) isotopes as well as more exotic non-traditional stable isotopes (Ag, Cu, Zn etc.) in both magmatic and hydrothermal mineral deposit research. Ore deposits dating applications using different techniques (including U-Pb, Ar-Ar, Re-Os), especially demonstrating 4D evolution (i.e. reliable measurement of the absolute timing of geological events) are also welcome.

Presenter

Prof. Svetlana Tessalina (svetlana.tessalina@curtin.edu.au)   

Affiliations

Curtin University Bldg. 301, Curtin University, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845, Perth, Australia

Domain of the Presenters

Dr Tessalina is an expert in radiogenic and stable isotopes and their application to ore deposit studies

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Students, academics, government, industry

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 50 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC09

Title

Mountains, water and the environment – a joint  Geoscience Information for Teachers (GIFT) workshop offered by the European Geoscience Union (EGU)/36th International Geological Congress (36th IGC)

Details

The main objective of the GIFT workshops is to spread first-hand scientific information to secondary science teachers, significantly shortening the time between discovery and textbook, and to provide the teachers with material that can be directly transported to the classroom.

Presenters

Prof. Chris  King; Prof. Ramanathan  Baskar; another nominated from CoE, EGU (chrisjhking36@gmail.com)

Affiliations

European Geosciences Union Committee on Education, 36 Portway Wells, United Kingdom

Domain of the Presenters

Chris King is Emeritus Professor of Earth Science Education at Keele University. He is Chair of the International Union of Geological Sciences Commission on Geoscience Education (IUGS-COGE); Dr. Baskar is Professor in Environmental Sciences in GJUST, Hisar, India and involved in research on environmental geology, environmental management, geobiology, geomicrobiology and natural hazards.

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020, Thursday 05 March 2020 and Friday 06 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Secondary school teachers

Number of Participants

Minimum: 70                                        Maximum: 100

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis.

Selection by Organisers (EGU/36IGC)

Book Now

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC10

Title

Understanding Fe-Mn Formations and High Grade Fe-Mn Ores: Origin, Controls and Explorations

Details

BIF-hosted iron ore deposits are the main resource base for the iron ores in the world. The short course will include highlights of recent research on origin of BIF-hosted iron ore deposits and implications for exploration.

Presenters

1. Dr. Joydip Mukhopadhyay (joydip17@gmail.com)  

2. Dr. Carlos A. Rosiere

3. Dr. Michiel de Kock

Affiliations

1. Professor, Presidency University, 86/1 College Street Kolkata, India

2. Professor, Federal University of Minas, Gerais, Brazil

3. Associate Professor, University of Johannesburg, South Africa

Domain of the Presenters

1. Sedimentology and sediment-hosted Fe-ore

2. Structural Geology; Fe Ore mineralisation

3. Paleomagmatism; Stratigraphy

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Exploration and mining geologists, researchers

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 75 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC11

Title

Ground Water, Demand and Supply Management

Details

To discuss how society could be made aware of the problems related to ground water quality and quantity, along with probable solutions.

Presenters

Dr. S D Limaye (sdlimaye@yahoo.com; sdlimaye@gmail.com); Dr. Sudhanshu Shekhar;

Dr. Dipankar  Saha

Affiliations

Indian National Committee of International Association of Hydrogeologists (INC-IAH)

Domain of the Presenters

Hydrologist, Groundwater Experts

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Hydrogeologists

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC12

Title

Geology, Geochemistry, Genesis and Exploration Criteria for Gold Deposits in Metamorphic Rock

Details

The course will focus on the geology of and exploration for orogenic gold deposits, the most widespread type of gold deposit globally. Dr. Goldfarb will provide descriptions of the most important Precambrian and Phanerozoic examples of orogenic gold ores formed in the world’s young accretionary orogens and old cratonic greenstone belts. Topics to be covered include tectonic and structural controls, geological characteristics, geochemical and geophysical signatures, geochronological relationships, and exploration strategies. Other gold deposit types with some overlapping features will be compared and contrasted to indicate what type of resources are the most favorable targets for the explorations in various provinces. The course is aimed at geoscientists from both industry and academia, as well as students of economic geology who desire a comprehensive understanding of modern concepts on the geology of orogenic gold deposits.

Presenters

Prof. Richard J. Goldfarb (rjgoldfarb@mac.com)

Affiliations

China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China

Domain of the Presenters

Richard J. Goldfarb was a research geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey for 36 years. His studies have focused on global metallogeny, geology of ore deposits in the North American Cordillera with emphasis on orogenic gold, lode gold deposits in China, and fluid inclusion and stable isotope applications to the understanding of ore genesis.  Rich has authored more than 230 papers on mineral resources, with many recognized as the authoritative research on gold in metamorphic terranes and on aspects of regional metallogeny. He is a past-president of the Society of Economic Geologists and past chief editor of Mineralium Deposita. Presently, Rich is a research professor at Colorado School of Mines and China University of Geosciences Beijing, and is an independent consultant to the exploration and mining industry.

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Geologists from Academia and Industry

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC13

Title

Chaos and Fractal theory

Details

Geophysical phenomena tend to exhibit characteristic scale-free behaviour over a range of length- and time-scales. A large number of studies have used the concepts of fractals, percolation and diffusion-limited aggregation, seemingly belonging to the realm of disordered systems, to unravel the intricacies of geological phenomena such as diagenesis and anti-sintering in sedimentary rocks to name just a few.  Power-laws abound and one finds a range of fractal dimensions of surface fractals as well as volume or mass fractals giving vital insights into geophysical mechanisms.

The basic concepts of percolation, fractal geometries, self-organization and chaos will be introduced in an elementary manner aiming at an audience that is not initiated in these concepts. 

Since the analysis and characterisation of geophysical space–time data from the viewpoint for chaos and fractals requires an interdisciplinary approach involving mathematicians, physicists and geoscientists, this short course will be aimed at a diverse audience with the hope that it will enthuse them to carry out research in Chaos and fractal theory. 

The concepts of percolation, fractals and chaos are increasingly becoming important in the realm of Geosciences but most scientists are not familiar with them. So the idea will be to give about 4 lectures in a down to earth manner and spend a good amount of time interacting with participants on a one on one manner.

Presenters

Dr. Vipin  Srivastava;

Dr. Abhey Ram Bansal (abhey.bansal@gmail.com)

Affiliations

CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute Uppal Road HyderabadIndia

Domain of the Presenters

Dr. Srivastava is a theoretical condensed matter physicists who has used ideas from fractals and chaos in his research, Dr. Bansal is a Geophysicist.

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Geologists from Academia and Industry

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC14

Title

Communications of Natural Hazards

Details

This short course will explore the use of practical demonstrations within the teaching or communications of natural hazards (e.g., earthquakes, landslides, weather, floods). This course will draw on a range of experiences, including the teaching of natural hazards in schools, universities and developing contexts. We encourage participants from all backgrounds with an interest in improving the understanding and communication of natural hazards geoscience through hands-on activities.

Presenter

Prof. Bruce D Malamud;       

Affiliations

Kings College London Department of Geography;

King's College London, Strand Campus Bush House (NE Wing), 30 Aldwych LondonUnited Kingdom

Domain of the Presenter

Bruce D. Malamud is Professor of Natural & Environmental hazards at King's College London, past president of the EGU Natural Hazards division, and current executive editor of Natural Hazards & Earth S

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue (1/2 Day)

Target Group

University teachers, high-school teachers, practioners working in communicties with impacted groups

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC15

Title

Some editor suggested do’s and don’ts when submitting manuscripts for publishing natural hazards research

Details

In this session, a current executive editor of the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (NHESS) will discuss expectations for submitted manuscripts, including what is good-practice vs. bad-practice (likely to cause rejection) when preparing and submitting a manuscript for consideration for publishing, along with best-practice when responding to reviewer and editor comments. There will be time for questions and comments

Presenter

Prof. Bruce D Malamud;       

Affiliations

Kings College London Department of Geography;

King's College London, Strand Campus Bush House (NE Wing), 30 Aldwych LondonUnited Kingdom

Domain of the Presenter

Bruce D. Malamud is Professor of Natural & Environmental hazards at King's College London, past president of the EGU Natural Hazards division, and current executive editor of Natural Hazards & Earth S

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue (1/2 Day)

Target Group

Scientists and PhD students, who are interested in learning about publishing

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC16

Title

An Introduction to Earthquake Detection Based on Template matching and Machine Learning

Details

Recent advancements in seismic instrumentations around the world provide an unprecedented opportunity to unravel detailed structures of the Earth’s interior and decipher earthquake processes. While many earthquakes have been routinely picked by seismic network analysts, a significant fraction of them are still missing, especially during intensive earthquake swarms, episodic tremor and slip, or foreshock/aftershock sequences. These missing events could be detected by a template matching method, which uses waveforms of existing events as templates to scan through continuous data for new events with high similarities. In this short course I first review recent progress on systematic detection of regular microearthquakes and slow low-frequency microearthquakes along major plate-boundary faults. These newly detected events help to better illuminate fault interfaces ruptured during large earthquakes, how faults relieve stresses in fast and slow slips, and how they interact with each other at nearby and long-range distances. Next I show how to go beyond template-matching methods and use network-based similarity and machine-learning techniques to pick seismic phases from large continuous waveforms. Unlike other deep learning methods that requires up to millions of accurately picked phases as labels, our method based on convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can be trained a relatively small labeled dataset. In addition, they can be applied to other regions with small modifications, suggesting that machine-learning based methods are more general than template matching methods and have great potential for detecting new seismic events from continuous waveforms.

This short course will include not only presentations on recent progresses of earthquake detections, but also a demonstration of computer codes that researchers can use to perform template-based and machine-learning-based detection.

Presenter

Prof. Zhigang Peng (zpeng@gatech.edu); 

Dr. Abhey Ram Bansal (abhey.bansal@gmail.com)

Affiliations

Georgia Tech 311 Ferst Drive Atlanta, United States;

Prncipal Scientist, CSIR-NGRI, Hyderabad  

Domain of the Presenter

Geophysics

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue (1/2 Day)

Target Group

Researchers that are interested in learning how to detect microearthquakes and low-frequency earthquakes

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC17

Title

Hyperspectral and HyLogging technology for advancing Exploration Through Cover, Ore Body Knowledge, and borehole data maximisation

Details

Scope: Hyperspectral drill core scanning technologies, such as HyLogger™, and The Spectral Geologist software (TSG), provide detailed mineralogical information to maximise the value and digital record of drilling programs.

The National Virtual Core Library (NVCL), part of AuScope’s national earth science infrastructure program, now comprises more than 1000 km of freely-accessible hyperspectral drill core data.

The prime objective of the NVCL is to unlock the vast resource of geological information from the upper 1 – 2 km of our Earth’s crust that is stored in drill core libraries and core sheds across Australia.  Sourced from various geological environments and mineral deposits across Australia, the NVCL represents one of the world’s largest collections of publically available mineralogical data (http://auscope.org.au/site/nvcl.php).

This course aims to improve understanding and use of the NVCL and spectral data, and free TSG viewing software"

Logistics: "Case studies will be presented during this workshop, including hands-on exercises to introduce the course attendants to CSIRO's The Spectral Geologist Software (TSG) and workflows used for working with spectral data. Participants are required to bring their own laptops for the hands-on exercises.

Presenter

Dr. Carsten  Laukamp (Carsten.Laukamp@csiro.au)         

Affiliations

CSIRO Mineral Resources 26 Dick Perry Avenue Kensington 6151, Australia

Domain of the Presenter

Carsten Laukamp (Dr. rer. Nat., Ruprecht Karls University Heidelberg, Germany) is a group leader at CSIRO Mineral Resources, Australia, and leads the National Virtual Core Library project.

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Exploration and mining industry, Geological Surveys, Universities

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 200 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC18

Title

Landslide susceptibility statistical modelling from theory to practice

Details

Course organized in the framework of LANDSLIP project "Landslide susceptibility statistical modelling from theory to practice". Description: Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in a given area on the base of local terrain conditions. This basically represent the degree to which an area can be affected by future mass movements, i.e. an estimate of “where” landslides are likely to occur. The lack of standards in landslide susceptibility modelling results in a huge and diversified variety of approaches, which has been widely described in the scientific and technical literature. This short course introduces the statistical landslide susceptibility modelling. The course has two main parts: the first gives a common glossary and definitions. It describes the variables, the mapping units and, the models commonly used for landslide susceptibility assessment and zonation. The second part introduces the LAND-SUITE open source tool, which allows to perform landslide susceptibility evaluations on a variety of geo-environmental settings and for diversified purposes. The course is targeting primarily geologists and/or geomorphologists and/or more in general applied geoscientist with a limited experience on landslide susceptibility modelling, but it also provides information potentially helpful for more experienced modelers. This short course introduces the statistical landslide susceptibility modelling. The course has two main parts: the first gives a common glossary and definitions. It describes the variables, the mapping units and, the models commonly used for landslide susceptibility assessment and zonation. The second part introduces the LAND-SUITE open source tool, which allows to perform landslide susceptibility evaluations on a variety of geo-environmental settings and for diversified purposes. The course is targeting primarily geologists and/or geomorphologists and/or more in general applied geoscientist with a limited experience on landslide susceptibility modelling, but it also provides information potentially helpful for more experienced modelers.

Presenter

1. Dr. Mauro  Rossi (mauro.rossi@irpi.cnr.it);

2. Dr. Claire Dashwood 

3. Dr. Christian  Arnhardt

Affiliations

1) CNR IRPI, Italy, Via Madonna Alta 126, 06128 Perugia, Italy; 2,3) British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK

Domain of the Presenter

Proposers are focusing on mapping, modelling, forecasting landslides in the framework of the LANDSLIP project

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Geologists, geomorphologists, applied geoscientist

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC19

Title

Foundations and Perspectives of Geoethics

Details

Rationale:

The proper and deep education on ethical issues in geosciences has been evolving in recent times, although not as quickly and deeply as necessary. Many of the professionals dedicated to Earth Sciences have been not in touch with such new concepts and tendencies as the concept of Geoethics. Geoethics is the research and reflection on the values which underpin appropriate behaviors and practices, wherever human activities interact with the Earth system. Geoethics provides a framework from which to define ethical professional behaviors in both geosciences and engineering, and to determine how these should be put into practice for the benefit of society and environment. This Short Course goes is directed towards introducing and training geoscientists in those new concept and ideas.

Speakers:

Nic Bilham, Martin Bohle, Giuseppe Di Capua, David Mogk, Silvia Peppoloni, Iain Stewart

Course Content:

1. From Ethics to Geoethics: Definition, Values, Tools (Silvia Peppoloni)

2. Responsible Conduct of Research and Professionalism (David Mogk)

3. Foundations & Examples, how to tackle (Geo)ethical Dilemmas (Martin Bohle)

4. Geoethics for Society: Sustainable Development and Responsible Mining (Nic Bilham)

5. Geoethics in Natural Hazards and Risks (Giuseppe Di Capua)

6. Geoethics in Geoscience Communication (Iain Stewart)

Discussion

After completing this course, participants:

1. Will know the basic principles of ethics and how these lead to geoethics.

2. Will be aware of the dilemmas involved in making geoethical decisions.

3. Will have gained some experience in taking a geoethical approach to real world cases.

Presenter

Dr. Giuseppe  Di Capua (iapgeoethics@aol.com)     

Affiliations

International Association for Promoting Geoethics (IAPG) via di Vigna Murata 605 Rome Italy; The Presenter is a Geologist at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (Rome, Italy)

Domain of the Presenter

His fields of experience cover engineering geology and geoethics

Date & Place

Thursday 05 March 2020; At venue; 1/2 Day

Target Group

Most, if not all, of the 36th IGC attendants are potential participants

Number of Participants

Minimum: 30                                        Maximum: 50

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC20

Title

Introduction to Petroleum Geomechanics

Details

Geomechanical studies prior to drilling a well has increasingly become important as we drill deeper and highly deviated to horizontal wells in difficult terrains. This short-course has been designed to give an overview of basic rock mechanics application in drilling. Knowledge of the magnitude and distribution of stress in the crust can be combined with mechanical, thermal and rheological constraints to examine wellbore stability. The key components of a comprehensive geomechanical model are knowledge of the current state of stress, pore-pressure and rock strength.

Presenter

Dr. Satish Kumar Sinha (ssinha@rgipt.ac.in)         

Affiliations

Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology RGIPT, Bengaluru, India

Domain of the Presenter

Associate Professor of Geophysics, PhD from University of Oklahoma, USA, of worked in petroleum industry, teaching in petroleum institute

Date & Place

Wednesday 04 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Graduate students and young professionals, especially those working in oil and gas industry

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                        Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 50 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC21

Title

Engineering geology in management of Geo-hazards and heritage sites

Details

Interactive session with younger and early career researchers to address the critical technical issues for civil construction, protection of heritage sites and precautionary ways to select sites for multifarious developmental projects

Presenter

Dr. Vinod K. Sharma (vksharma_gsi@yahoo.co.in)

Affiliations

Retired Geoscientist (GSI)

C-1/492A, Sector G, Jankipuram, Lucknow, India

Domain of the Presenter

Experience spanning over 35 years in GSI and specializing in Engineering Geology, Landslide investigations and Landslide susceptibility mapping for urban development.

Date & Place

Friday 06 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Students and early researchers

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC22

Title

Integrated Subsurface Interpretation

Details

This 2-day course is designed to provide participants with a modern awareness of the full spectrum of methods used to map and integrate subsurface data sets, primarily for the exploration and development of natural resources including petroleum and water.

This course begins with an overview of sedimentary depositional systems, mechanisms of transport and deposition, stratigraphic stacking patterns, predictive characteristics, and 3D heterogeneity.  Taught from the perspective of an exploration business unit, diverse industry datasets are used throughout the course to illustrate the scale of sedimentary environments and their petroleum reservoirs, seals, and traps. 

This collaborative course utilizes 3D seismic, core, well log, outcrop and various analytical tools including XRF, XRD, LA-ICP-MS among many others to examine the subsurface focusing on depositional environments from feeder systems that link the shelf to submarine canyon and transport sediment downslope to submarine fan and distal basin plain environments, using extensive outcrop, core, and seismic examples from various passive and active margins – including several examples from petroleum basins in Asia-Pacific. 

This course is designed to give industry professionals an appreciation of sedimentary transport processes that control depositional products, as well as knowledgeable insight into the scale and architecture of the wide range of petroleum reservoirs using 3D seismic, well-log, core and other industry data sets.  This course draws from materials presented in field trips to a variety of sedimentary basins including those located in North and South America, Europe and Asia-Pacific.

Objectives:

This course will give participants an understanding of the broad scope of subsurface interpretation as it pertains primarily to marine siliciclastic depositional systems.  By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

•           Map several of the different types of marine siliciclastic depositional environments (deltaic environments and those of submarine fans, valleys, and aprons – canyon, channel, levee, splay, overbank) and their implications to petroleum reservoir architecture and reservoir quality

•           Understand the context, limitations, and utility in datasets used to perform seismic interpretation, reservoir characterization, core analysis, geophysical log interpretation, sequence stratigraphy, play fairway mapping, risk and uncertainty analysis, gross depositional environment mapping, STOOIP calculation, and oil and gas exploration methods

•           Integrate seismic, outcrop, core, and other oil and gas industry data to inform drilling decisions

•           Apply seismic attributes to identify and illuminate depositional features and aid in the understanding of reservoir presence and reservoir quality

•           Use modern and ancient depositional systems as analogs for exploration targets

•           Characterize shelf, slope and basin floor deposits, including storm deposits, and those of turbidites, and transitional to hybrid flows, and understand their transport and depositional processes

•           Understand geologic risk and uncertainty methods in the context of exploration and appraisal

•           Apply predictive depositional models built by first principles to characterize deep-water reservoir properties

•           Apply source-to-sink transport and sequence stratigraphic methods to marine and deep-water sediment delivery

Description:

This course will alternate between inclusive lectures, hands-on technical demonstrations, and intensive collaborative exercises involving practical application of cores, outcrops, well logs, seismic, and other industry data.  As with other company courses, this course is taught primarily based on case studies.

The course starts with an overview of sediment gravity flows and how they accumulate to form some of the most prolific petroleum reservoirs on Earth.  Both the scientific and economic drivers of understanding deep-water depositional systems are emphasized, and modern and ancient analogues are discussed.  Next, exercises involving core, outcrop, and seismic data are used to interpret gross depositional environments and ultimately define common risk segment maps, all while observing the scale and architecture of marine depositional systems formed by turbidity currents, debris flows, mass-transport events, and other processes associated with deep-water environments from outer shelf, to slope, to basin plain.  Integration of additional reservoir quality data enhances the understanding of appraisal and development drilling options.  Throughout the 2-day course, geologic risk and uncertainty concepts will be applied to the exercises.  Finally, a regional mapping exercise will apply the concepts learned in sequence stratigraphy and will be used to construct maps in a variety of continental margin depositional settings. 

The course will conclude with a summary discussion of the realistic expectations in siliciclastic petroleum reservoirs, as well as new research that is changing these paradigms.  By the end of the course, participants will be able to map depositional systems at a variety of scales using disparate data and discuss the implications for reservoir and seal properties.

Course Itinerary:

This is a 10-part intermediate-level course aimed at preparing participants for business unit experience, focusing on oil and gas exploration and production in siliciclastic marine settings.  While some of the concepts may be advanced, participants will be taught how to observe and interpret deep-water depositional systems through interactive lectures and frequent hands-on collaborative exercises using real-world exploration and production data. 

1.         Introduction to integrated subsurface interpretation

2.         Fundamental building blocks of petroleum reservoirs: Sedimentation models and facies

3.         21st century downslope sediment gravity flow evolution: Incorporating new observations on grain size distribution and flow rheology

4.         Source-to-sink applications and scaling relationships: Linking terrestrial transport to marine deposition

5.         Deep-water clastic depositional environments: Illustrations of elements and environments from shelf to deep-water basin plain

6.         Scales of petroleum reservoir heterogeneity: Revisiting architectural elements – the advantages and limitations

7.         Deep-water tectonic settings: From active margins to passive margins

8.         Deep-water sequence stratigraphy: History and 21st century concepts including special reference to systems tracts and key mapping surfaces

9.         Summary of a deep-water petroleum system: Reservoirs, seals, and source rocks

10.       Petroleum play typing in deep-water settings: Concept origination to spud

Presenters

Dr. Jon  Rotzien (jonrotzien@basindynamics.com)  

Dr. Sumit Verma 

Affiliations

Dr. Rotzien is the President of Basin Dynamics and Adjunct Professor at University of Houston, USA

Dr. Sumit Verma is Assistant Professor at University of Texas Permian Basin, USA

Domain of the Presenters

Geophysics and Basin Dynamics

Date & Place

Friday & Saturday, 06 & 07 March 2020;

At venue

Target Group

This course is designed for employees of oil and gas companies in technical to management positions.

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 750 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC23

Title

Geochemical mapping at all scales:  Continental, regional and local

Details

To teach interested future applied geochemists the professional organisation of a geochemical survey from the field, laboratory, quality control, data processing to report writing.

In mineral exploration and environmental geosciences, understanding the geochemical patterns on the Earth's surface requires the application of well-designed geochemical surveying methods that can be applied at the local, regional and even global scales. The aim of the one-day workshop is to introduce methods for designing and implementing regional geochemical surveys. This ranges from selection of sampling media and analytical methods to visualising and interpreting the results.  All geochemical methods and techniques will be presented and discussed by using documented real data sets from various case studies from around the Globe.

Presenters

Dr. Alecos  Demetriades (alecos.demetriades@gmail.com);

Dr. Philippe Negrel

Affiliations

IUGS Commission On Global Geochemical Baselines P.O.BOX 640 47, ZOGRAFOU Athens, Greece

Dr. Philippe Negrel is a Geoscientist from BRGM, France

Domain of the Presenters

Dr. Alecos Demetriades has more than 40 years experience in Applied Geochemistry. Worked at Rio Tinto Finance and Exploration Limited (1972-1973) as a researcher for the compilation of a global mineral deposits;

Dr. Negrel’s specialisation is Geochemistry

Date & Place

Friday 06 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Applied Geochemists and Environmental Geochemists

Number of Participants

Minimum: 30                                       Maximum: 50

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC24

Title

Geotechnical, Geological and Geophysical Investigations for Seismic Microzonation and Site-Specific Earthquake Hazard Analysis

Details

The topic has a great relevance to earthquake risk resilience of structures for India and South Asia. In this short course the Geotechnical, Geological and Geophysical investigations for seismic microzonation and site specific earthquake hazard Analysis will be explained.

For seismic microzonation or assessment of seismic hazard around selected sites of economic importance first of all geology of the area is studied to understand basic earthquake hazard. Seismicity and tectonics is studied up to 300km distance from the site and in more details within 50 km radius. To know the nature of soil layers and drainage pattern a geomorphological map is prepared by remote sensing and ground check. Depth and seismic shear velocity of near surface soil/rock layers, besides by drilling, is estimated with geophysical methods like MSWA, analysis of seismograms, microearthquakes recording and PS-logging. For deep basins the soil/rock layers are estimated by gravity, seismic reflection and magnetotelluric geophysical surveys. Many times these geophysical methods are needed to know the exact location and orientation of geological faults.

The Peak Spectral Acceleration (PSA) is estimated on grid pattern with spacing of 0.5km. The methodology is divided into three parts (i) Establishment of Engineering Bed Layer (EBL) (a layer above which the soil effect is to be estimated) from borehole data, SPT N-Values and seismic shear velocity of soil layers, (ii) Estimation of strong ground motion at EBL using strong motion simulation technique and (iii) Estimation of surface strong motion parameters and soil amplification by passing the ground motion estimated at EBL through soil models prepared from borehole data and shallow geophysical surveys. The soil models are prepared using 30 to 90 m deep boreholes at 2km grid. The EBL may be estimated, say at depths of 15 to 60 m for seismic velocity of ~ 500 to 760 m/sec with SPT N-Value of 80-100. The soil models are prepared based on soil classification and SPT N-Value above EBL. The 1D ground response analysis is conducted through SHAKE and strong motion parameters are estimated at surface. The PGA maps and spectral acceleration (Sa) maps for 0.1 to 1.25 sec are also prepared. The soil amplification ratio estimated for shallow layers is used for suggesting foundation design. Liquefaction potential is also estimated.

Presenters

Dr. B.K.  Rastogi;

Dr. Abhey Ram Bansal (abhey.bansal@gmail.com)       

Affiliations

Dr. B. K. Rastogi, President, Ind. Soc. Earthq. Former Director General, Institute of Seismological Research, Gandhinagar and Former Scientist  'G', CSIR-NGRI, Hyderabad;

Dr. A. R. Bansal is the Principal Scientist, CSIR-NGRI, Hyderabad, India

Domain of the Presenters

Geophysics & Seismology

Date & Place

Friday 06 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Researchers that work on seismic data analysis,  microzonation studies and hazard estimations

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC25

Title

Fractured Reservoir characterization

Details

The proposed workshop is designed to let the audience get introduced with naturally fractured reservoirs, their distribution in the world, the principal characteristics of naturally fractured reservoirs in terms of elastic properties of rock and fluids, geophysical monitoring, reservoir fluid distribution, reservoir dynamics & fluid flow, pressure behaviour, drainage and imbibition in a simplified single-block model, flow regimes identification in fractures, etc. 

At the end of this course, the audience will become familiar with some of the world’s Giant and supergiant NFR; also, they will be able to distinguish different flow regimes (pre-Darcy, Darcy, post-Darcy, viscous, Brinkman), drainage and imbibition in fractured systems, etc.

Presenters

Dr. Reza  Azin (reza.azin@pgu.ac.ir);

Dr. Nimisha Vedanti (nimisha@ngri.res.in)

Affiliations

Associate Professor, Petroleum Engineering, Persian Gulf University, Iran

Sr. Scientist in CSIR-NGRI, Hyderabad

Domain of the Presenters

Dr. Azin has 20 years of experience in upstream and downstream oil and gas industries. Focus on Experimental, as well as Theoretical and Numerical;

Dr. Nimisha is a Geophysicist doing reaseach in basin dynamics

Date & Place

Friday 06 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Students , Researchers and Academicians working in the field of Reservoir (Geology/ Geophysics/ Engineer)

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 40 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC26

Title

New Microscopy Workflows in Geoscience: Bridging the scale problem by utilizing correlative workflows & the power machine learning

Details

New microscopy workflows in Geoscience: Bridging the scale problem by utilising correlative workflows and the power of machine learning. Intellis and machine segmentation, Correlative workflows. 3 D, 4D microscopy applications in Geoscience research

Presenter

Mr. Shaun  Graham (viswuppu2@gmail.com)      

Affiliations

Carl Zeiss, 50 Kaki Bukit Place, Singapore

Domain of the Presenters

Shaun Graham a post graduate from Leicester university has been  employed with CarlZeiss Cambridge  from the past 5 years working on application of Automated Minerology in REE , PM etc.

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

All geologist who use microscopy as a solution

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC27

Title

The 21st Century Geoscientist: Tools and Skills for Students and Early Career Scientists

Details

Description:

Building on the different offerings to students and early career scientists at the International Geological Congress, AGU proposes to host a Workshop that will showcase how to be an ethical and successful scientist in the 21st Century. Aligning with the 36th IGC’s theme “Basic Science for a Sustainable Future,” the training workshop will feature modules on career-building best practices related to ethics; publishing; data; communication; transdisciplinary and community science. The event will conclude with a reception for participants to network and connect with their fellow attendees.

The full-day event will be free to registrants on a first come, first serve basis and will require an RSVP in advance. In the spirit of collaboration, the workshop welcomes participation from IGC attendees, partners, and YES members.

Learning objective:

The workshop will supply students and early career scientists, with a variety of tools and skillsets needed to support their near- and long-term careers in or across academia, policy, and the private sector.

Training modules will cover:

Ethics, Diversity, Inclusion

Historically, there has been a lack of diversity and inclusion in the geosciences. This training will model AGU’s Ethics Policy by identifying and understanding root causes of implicit bias; highlight ways to reduce biases and improve diversity; and outline core principles on ethics in the geosciences.

Drafting Journal-Ready Manuscripts: Best Practices

Publishing peer-reviewed papers is a well-known and grumbled about metric for success of graduate students. For many it determines their post-grad school career path, where they may be judged based on publications. Submitting journal-ready manuscripts is a practiced skill, not an innate one. Here registrants will learn about what makes a good journal paper and best practices for having a manuscript accepted for publishing.

Handling Data: Data Management Techniques

A picture is worth a thousand words – especially when trying to find relationships and understand data, which could include thousands of variables. In this tutorial, registrants will learn the principles of FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) data and how to keep track of and process data to effectively convey information to different audiences.

Science Communication Fundamentals:

What’s the value of doing science communication (scicomm), and what are the essential skills needed to do it effectively? In this tutorial, participants will learn more about how to: identify and connect with target audiences; recognize and reduce jargon; tell science stories through research; and develop compelling and memorable messages.

• Working with Communities to Solve Local Challenges

Developed by the Thriving Earth Exchange, the tutorial will highlight the skills needed to build effective relationships with communities to address critical local needs in climate change, natural hazards, and natural resources. In this workshop, participants will understand barriers to co-creation of science and learn ways to overcome these barriers, provide concrete strategies that scientists can employ to make community science projects a success, and teach participants how to scope community science projects

Presenters

Ms. Janice  Lachance (mshimamoto@agu.org)

Mr. Mark M Shimamoto

Affiliations

AGU 2000, Florida Ave. NW, Washington, USA

Domain of the Presenters

Janice Lachance, Esq., FASAE, Executive Vice President, Strategic Leadership and Global Outreach, AGU

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Student and Early Career

Number of Participants

Minimum: 50                                       Maximum: 200

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC28

Title

Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) and Young Earth Science Network (YES) joint workshop for early career researcher

Details

The workshop will include both introductory lectures and also round table discussion with pioneer on the following topics to strengthen the early career researcher who are at different stage of their career:

1. How to write a research grant Proposal

2. Career after your PhD: Academic vs non-Academic

3. Networking for introverted scientists

4. How to work together for the interdisciplinary research in Geoscience ?

Presenters

Dr. Neelu  Singh (neelu.singh0387@gmail.com);

Dr. Meng Wang;

Dr. S. Rajan     

Affiliations

Dr. Neelu Singh is Vice President APECS; Dr. Meng Wang is President, Young Earth Scientists Network (YES); Dr. Rajan is an expert from NCPAOR

Domain of the Presenters

Geoscientists engaged in Polar and Ocean Research.

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue

Target Group

Early Career Researcher and PhD scholars

Number of Participants

Minimum: 30                                       Maximum: 50

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC29

Title

Plugging in to 21st Century Geoscience Education:  Rethinking Science Education for the Anthropocene

Details

Despite rapid advances in technology and the availability of information, geoscience education remains mired in 19th and 20th century models, where a sage instructor relays expert information to eager young minds.  Not only is this idyllic vision of education ineffective for most learners, it is becoming increasingly inappropriate for a world that is awash in information but not the skillsets necessary to discover and parse information into usable knowledge.

This course will explore active learning techniques, a way of structuring your classroom or educational experiences to engage your audience more deeply than the typical passive learning techniques deployed in most classrooms (for example, lectures followed by exams).  In active learning, students and their questions take center stage, while the instructor acts as a "guide on the side", directing them in acquiring the skills necessary to ask good questions, explore topics, and build knowledge.  This approach more closely mimics the scientific process of discovery that we are familiar with and apply in our everyday work.

Participants will be introduced to instructivism ("learn from the expert"), constructivism ("build knowledge for yourself"), and connectivism ("build knowledge with your community") and examples of teaching in each type of approach.  Participants will also see examples of how each approach is deployed in classroom settings, including in-person courses, hybrid and flipped classrooms, and completely online courses.  We'll explore best practices for each setting as well as common pitfalls.

Participants will work together and with the instructor to redevelop commonly taught topics into an active learning format, then critique and evaluate each other’s' learning experiences.  Participants will also learn about the common tools that are available for building active learning experiences, how to use them to start developing their own content, and how to evaluate the effectiveness of the content they've developed.

Presenters

Dr. Lev  Horodyskyj (levh@sciencevoices.org)       

Affiliations

Science Voices 416 E Carson Drive, Tempe, USA

Domain of the Presenters

Dr. Lev Horodyskyj received his PhD in Geosciences and Astrobiology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  Since then, he has been working on innovative geoscience education, both online and offline.

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Geoscience instructors, teachers, and educators at all career levels

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC30

Title

Archaeological issue and Geology

Details

Geology and Archaeological Issues

Presenter

Dr. Shivaji Dadaso Kshirsagar (shivajinewgeoarch@gmail.com)      

Affiliations

Deccan college post graduate and research institute (deemed university), Pune, India

Domain of the Presenter

Archaeology

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Any person who is in archaeological issues in geology or other subject

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC31

Title

Monitoring glacier ice velocities in the polar regions

Details

The main objective of the workshop is to introduce open source data, software and tools to monitor glacier ice velocities in the polar regions (Greenland, Antarctica).

The outline of the workshop are as follows:

1. Remote sensing of the polar glaciers (theory and state-of-the-art tools and methods)

2. Introduction to European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-1 radar mission

3. Create free user account and data download from the NASA Earth Data Alaska Satellite Facility data platforms

4. Application of offset tracking method to estimate glacier ice velocities using ESA SNAP software (open source) - This includes showing processing steps on its graphical user interface and creating a flow graph for batch processing

5. Time-series analysis (statistics and plotting) on one of the Greenland's marine-terminating glaciers using open source R software

Presenter

Dr. Saurabh  Vijay (saurabhvergia@gmail.com)

Affiliations

The Ohio State University, United States Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, 1090 Carmack Road, Columbus, OHIO 43210, USA

Domain of the Presenter

Saurabh Vijay received his PhD degree from FAU Germany and has employed remote sensing techniques to study glacier changes in Greenland and high mountain Asia

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Students and scientists working on glaciology (e.g. National Center of Polar and Ocean Research)

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

Book Now

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC32

Title

Ore microscopy and geometallurgical applications

Details

To make aware of process mineralogy, which is not a curriculum in most of institutions and its application in metal/materials industry through transmitted/reflected light optics. Anisotropic materials through polarized beam of light.

Systematic observation of properties and ore identification procedures. Qualitative and quantitative properties.

  • Ore identification_1: native elements, oxides, gangue (silicate and non-silicate) minerals.
  • Ore identification_2: sulfides, sulphosalts. Textural analysis and interpretation for defining the mesh of grind (MOG).
  • Applications for nonferrous, ferrous and industrial minerals problems during process control, modification in flow sheet, quantification of liberation, misplacement and tailing losses. Detailed study on automated mineralogy.
  • An implication of this study for process improvement in order to assess the profitability in business.

Presenter

Dr. Navin K Sharma (drnavinin@gmail.com);

Dr. John Thella;

Dr. Vishwanath  Uppugunduri

Affiliations

Consultant (Process Mineralogy) / Vedanta Resources Ltd./ Zeiss-India Technology and Innovation (CRDL) Zinc smelter Debari-313024, Udaipur, India

Domain of the Presenter

Dr N. K. Sharma has more than 35 years’ experience in Geology, Mining, Exploration, Smelting units and Process Mineralogical. He is also a holder of two patents.

Dr. Thella and Dr. Vishwanath also have long experiences in Mining and Exploration

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Professional, faculties, students in Geology, material sciences and mineral process engineers.

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges. Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC33

Title

Making the Earth move: the art of communicating geoscience

Details

To make geoscientists (even) better at writing and speaking about their research.

Presenter

Mr. Peter Milner Spinks (science-writing@inbox.com)        

Affiliations

Science-writer, Broadcaster and Media Professional - SCIENCE OUTREACH IN ACTION (http://scienceoutreachworkshops.weebly.com/presenter.html)

Domain of the Presenter

Peter Spinks holds a master’s degree in research psychology and has published articles in international academic journals. Since 1980, he has broadcast and written for some of the world's foremost media organisations, including the British Broadcasting Corporation, The Guardian and The Observer newspapers and New Scientist magazine in London.

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Geoscientists worldwide

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 50

Cost

USD 140 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC34

Title

Geometallurgy and application of automated mineralogy in study of ferrous, basemetals, precious metals and REE ores

Details

With increasing demand for critical, precious metals and base metals on one side and complex, deeper and lower-grade ore bodies, geometallurgy which is an integration of exploration, mine development and optimization is a valuable tool for maximising recovery and profitability. Automated and quantitative mineralogy constitutes an integral part of the geometallurgical framework as it provides data to help develop and predict geometallurgical parameters for geological and processing performance that reflect inherent geological variability, the understanding of field relationships of various rock units in a deposit, distribution of ore and gangue minerals, define geological domains based on mineral abundances, and liberation and association of ore.

The course will outline the geomet characerstics of some Indian   ferrous, basemetals, precious metals and REE ores with some case studies of application of automated mineralogy in preparation of geometallurgical model that can then be used to manage risk and enhance profitability for the mine/ deposit

Presenters

Prof. vishwanath  uppugunduri (vishwanath.uppugunduri.ext@zeiss.com);   

Dr. Naveen Sharma; 

Dr. John  Thella

Affiliations

Retd head R&D HZL (Vedanta), J 27, Diamond District, Domalur Bangalore, India

Domain of the Presenter

Prof U.Vishwanath Retd. Head R&D OF HZL Vedanta is a pioneer in the field of geomettalurgy with more than 37 yrs experience in exploration , mining and processing of base and precious metals

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Geoscientists worldwide

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC35

Title

Magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineral systems: Genetic models and exploration strategies

Details

  • Introduction to magmatic sulfide ore deposits – types of deposit, occurrence and localisation, global resource endowment, compositions of parent magmas, chemistry of sulfide liquids, mineralogy and phase equilibria of sulfides

 

  • Magmatic Ni-Co sulfide deposits in komatiites and komatiitic basalts

 

  • Magmatic Ni-Cu-Co-(PGE) sulfide deposits in small mafic-ultramafic intrusions: morphology and emplacement of host bodies, case studies including Norilsk-Talnakh (Russia), Voisey’s Bay (Canada), Savannah and Nova (Australia)

 

  • Silicate-sulfide textures in Ni-Cu sulfide ores and mobility of sulfide liquid

 

  • Physical processes in magmatic sulfide ore formation: length-scales and time-scales, fluid dynamics of silicate-sulfide liquid interactions, some myths and misconceptions

 

  • Exploration strategies: from prediction to detection, lithogeochemistry and mineral chemistry tools, applying genetic models.

 

The workshop will incorporate lecture and hands-on participation exercises

Presenters

Dr. Steve Barnes (Steve.barnes@csiro.au)

Affiliations

CSIRO Mineral Resources, Perth, Australia

Domain of the Presenter

Dr Steve Barnes is an economic geologist with particular interests in magmatic ore deposits and Archean volcanism. He has been with CSIRO in Perth, Australia, since 1985, with a brief interlude in the exploration industry, and formerly held the position of Science Leader in CSIRO Mineral Resources. He has published over 150 journal papers and book chapters covering ore deposits and host rocks on six continents. He was the recipient in 2011 of the Gibb-Maitland Medal of the Geological Society of Australia WA Division for services to Western Australian geology, and is a former member of the Economic Geology editorial board.

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Exploration industry professionals, academics and students with interests in applied igneous petrology

Number of Participants

Minimum: 15                                       Maximum: 50

Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

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Workshop/ Short Course: WSC36

Title

Bridging the gap between geoscience and society through communication

Details

Being a knowledge system with high potential for influencing the dynamics of life at various strata of the society, the need for strengthening connection between geoscience and society will be increasing exponentially in the forthcoming years of Anthropocene. The public and policy makers are lending their ears more frequently to the geoscientists and closely watching the results coming out of their laboratories since the life and livelihood of millions are being negatively impacted by the fury of climate change induced variations in the atmosphere and hydrosphere, increasing frequency of natural disasters etc. Raise in the exploration and extraction of geo-resources are also likely to change the existing relationship between states and ignite geoscience-society conflict in various parts of the globe. Although, significant developments happened in the field of satellite and geospatial technologies escalated the efficacy of monitoring various geological phenomena, a spike in the popularization of the information communication technology worked as a double-edged sword in determining the nature of geoscience-society relationship. On one side, people used such technologies for mitigating the effect of natural disasters, parallelly propagation of the miss and disinformation making people insecure and panic got momentum. In recent years eliminating the misconceptions, empowering people to make informed decision making and maintaining public trust on the geoscience has evolved as major responsibility of the geoscientists along with generating new knowledge. In a nation like India – a mosaic of geo-environmental features, cultures and social norms - communicating scientific information up to the lowermost stratum of the society without any distortion, requires strategies considering the mindset of target population. Such an approach requires convergence of the knowledge from science, social science, communication studies, cognitive science and joint action of experts from these domains.  Geoscience being interdisciplinary in nature boundaries between its subdisciplines are blurring quickly. Hence empowering geoscientists to communicate their findings with the public and policy makers and convince them about the impact of such novel information on society can, not only benefit the citizens but also catalyze the convergence of ideas from subdisciplines, communicating with jargons specific to their subject, for achieving the goals of sustainable development.  

The proposed half day workshop will introduce the developments in the domain of geoscience communication and both modern and conventional tools popularly used for sharing the new knowledge with public and policy makers to the participants. Making audience familiar with the research and techniques being utilized for understanding public perception, mechanisms behind making sense of scientific information and accepting it by people from different demographics and providing directions for developing public involved geoscience communication programmes are the other aim of this training session.

Presenters

Dr V. V. Binoy (vvbinoy@nias.res.in)

Prof. M Sai Baba (msaibaba@nias.res.in)

Affiliations

School of Natural Science and Engineering

National Institute of Advanced Studies

Indian Institute of Science Campus

Bangalore - 560 012

Domain of the Presenter

Dr V.V. Binoy is an Assistant Professor in the School of Natural Science and Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bangalore. He is a cognitive scientist interested in social cognition, science communication and education. One major line of his research focuses on the cognitive and non-cognitive factors determining sense making of disaster warning messages by people from different demographics. He is the co-editor of the volume titled Bridging the Communication Gap in Science and Technology: Lessons from India, published by Springer, and the coordinator of a citizen science initiative titled ‘Student-Scientist’.

Prof. M. Sai Baba, Outstanding Scientist and formerly Director, Resources Management Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam and Senior Professor, Homi Bhabha National Institute. Presently holding “TV Raman Pai Chair Professor” at National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru and working in the domain of Science Communication and Risk Communication, Human Reliability Program and Understanding Ancient Indian Knowledge Systems for applying them for the holistic development of youth.

Present work includes, obtaining effective and informative insights on managing public perceptions and public acceptance of public risks associated with new and emerging technologies, through science and technology communications.  Developing platforms for enhancing interaction between scientists and public using conventional and nonconventional media of communication. Outlining strategies based on science and technology communication to manage the fear of hazards from novel technologies possessed by the public. 

Date & Place

Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue ½ Day

Target Group

Scientists, Academicians, Policy Makers, Research scholars and Post graduate students

Number of Participants

Minimum: 20                                       Maximum: 40

Cost

USD 170 per Participant (Inclusive of GST)

Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

 

Workshop/ Short Course: WSC37

  Title

  Recognition,  classification, Geometry, kinematics and microstructural study of Ductile Shear Zones

  Details  

 

 The study of ductile shear zones has assumed significance in light of their major role in accumulating large amount of strain during tectonism, recorded throughout the geological history. Very   often these are also the loci of extensive mineralization. These planar or curvi-planar high-strain zones are the result of inhomogeneous deformation having a dominant non-coaxial   component of strain. Intervening (crustal) blocks remain relatively unaffected by the deformation. A great variety of differently deformed rock types and characteristic structural features   develop as these high strain zones pass through a great range of depth. In the Indian context, from the Archaean cratonic blocks to the youngest orogenic belts like Himalayas, shear zones   are present in all different scales and characters and proper identification, mapping and understanding of the shear zones are of utmost importance in conceptualizing crustal evolution,   tectonism and even mineral fertility. Taking that into consideration a short half-day course during the 36th IGC is proposed for the postgraduate students, research scholars and young   professionals working in deformed terrains.

  Resource Persons/ Presenters

 1) Dr. Abhinaba Roy, GSI (Retd.) roy.abhinaba49@gmail.com; abhinabaroy630@yahoo.com

 2) Siladitya Sengupta, GSI, DGCO, New Delhi

 senguptasiladitya@gmail.com

  Affiliation (s)

 Geological Survey of India

  Domain of the Presenter

 Structural Geology

  Date & Place

 Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue

  Target Group

 Postgraduate students, Research Scholars and young professionals

  Number of Participants

 Minimum: 20                                                          Maximum: 40

  Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

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Workshop/ Short Course: WSC38

 Title

 To Understand and Predict Rock Mass Behavior for construction of Large Civil Structures

 Details

 

 This Training Program aims to improve participants' ability to understand and predict Rock Mass Behavior for construction of Large Civil Structures like Dams, Tunnels, and Power Houses.   Besides, Slope Stability issues while constructing Highways in Hilly Terrains will also be covered.

 Resource Persons/ Presenters

  1.     Dr. Gopal  Dhawan (gdhawangeologist@gmail.com);  

  2.     Mr. Yogendra  Deva (yogendradeva@gmail.com);

  3.     Mr. Naresh Kumar Mathur (nkmathur55@rediffmail.com)

 Affiliation (s)

 Dr. Dhawan Academy Of Geologists, 120, Maa Niwas, Jal Shakti Vihar, P4 Builders Area, Gr. Noida, Gautam Buddha Nagar, U.P. 201315 Greater Noida, India

 Domain of the Presenter

 Engineering Geology

 Dr. Gopal Dhawan (Founder Dr. Dhawan Academy of Geologists, Former CMD, MECL, Former ED, NHPC), Mr. Yogendra Deva (Former Director, GSI),  Mr. Naresh Mathur( Former GM,   NHPC)

 Date & Place

 Saturday 07 March 2020; At venue

 Target Group

 Geologist, Engineering Geologist, Engineers, Rock Support Engineers, Young Scholars, Geoscientists.

 Number of Participants

 Minimum: 20                                                          Maximum: 40

 Cost

This course is free of any charges; Participants are selected on “First Come First Served” basis

Book Now